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Thursday, September 5, 2019

How To Make Clam Toasts With Pancetta - A Complete Guide!


There is no doubt that one of the most popular foods served in the USA today is Italian food, but where did it come from? What is its origin? Italian food has evolved over the centuries. The country that we know as Italy didn't become a country until the 19th century. Its roots can be traced back as early as the 4th century BC. It is because of this long history we are lucky to have so many different and tasty foods from Italy. The ingredients and taste these dishes offer vary by region. Many have become national dishes while others have remained regional specialties.


Italian migrants from the Southern region brought Italian cuisine to the United States. Macaroni and cheese were one of the earliest Italian dishes Americans got to taste in restaurants. The Italian cuisine started gaining popularity in the 80s and 90s. Risottos and wine sauces of the North and pasta and pizzas of the South became fashionable. And now, 100,000 out of 800,000 restaurants in the U.S. serve Italian food.  

Just like pizzas and pasta, every Italian seafood is a must-try. Traditional Italian seafood recipes are not family secrets anymore. If you want to stop your mouth watering by satisfying your seafood craving, then you can buy seafood online or make your favourite seafood dish in your own kitchen. So, let’s whet your appetite with one of the iconic Italian seafood recipes - Clam Toasts with Pancetta. 

Clam Toasts with Pancetta

Ingredients
       Finely chopped medium sweet onion - ½ 
       Finely chopped small fennel bulb - ½
       Fennel fronds - ¼ cup
       Ground fennel - ½ tablespoon 
       Dry white wine, divided -  1 cup
       Sourdough bread - 2 (1 1/12-inch-thick) slices
       Olive Oil, divided, a little extra for drizzling - 4 tablespoons
       Finely chopped pancetta (Italian bacon) - 2 ounces
       Garlic clove - 4 (2 whole, 2 thinly sliced)
       Bay Leaf - 1
       Manila or littleneck clams or cockles - 1 pound
       Parsley leaves with tender stems - ¼ cups
       2 wide 3-inch strips lemon zest

Instructions

       Heat one tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat in a large Skillet.
       Add pancetta, cook and occasionally stir for 5-7 minutes until brown and crisp.  
       Add sliced garlic, cook and stir for 1 minute until golden around the edges. 
       Add chopped fennel and sweet onion after reducing heat to medium-low. Cook and stir for 6-8 minutes until onion is translucent.  
       Add bay leaf, lemon zest, ½ cup wine, ground fennel and a pinch of salt. Cook after increasing heat to medium-high. Stir for 3 minutes until a small amount of wine is left and the mixture is a little saucy. 
       Discard bay leaf and lemon zest and move soffritto to a medium bowl. Wipeout skillet.
       Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Cook until golden brown after arranging slices of bread in a skillet. Drain by transferring to a paper towel. 
       Cut 1 garlic clove half and then rub the cut side on one side of each toast. Wipeout skillet.
       Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat in the same skillet. Crush remaining garlic, cook and stir for 1 minute until it starts turning golden.  
       Add soffritto, clams and ½ cup wine. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat.  
       Cook uncovered for 5-7 minutes until clams are open and liquid is reduced by half. Discard clams that are not open.  
       Add fennel fronds and parsley and cook 1 minute longer.
       Now taste and season with salt. 
       Spoon cooking broth and clam mixture over fried bread placed on plates. 
       Drizzle with oil and then sprinkle red pepper flakes.
You can make Sofrito 2 days ahead or you can also buy this seafood online; the choice is yours.

If you want to explore the complete range of Italian Seafood then there is no need to go here and there. Just visit Italian food online store to find the maximum variety of authentic Italian products for sale on the web.

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